Among the multitude of foreign actors vying for influence in Iraq is Russia. Western influence is on the wane as Moscow ups its efforts to engage the political elite; energy companies with ties to the Kremlin are central to this, spearheading a strategy of ‘commercial diplomacy’.
With a monopoly over the production of electricity cables, the Elsewedy family are quite simply giants in Cairo’s business scene. Trends suggest that they are seeking to safeguard their assets by gaining strong political status, which has profound implications not only for sector dynamics but systemic integrity as a whole.
Emir of Abu Dhabi and UAE President Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan is vastly wealthy; reports indicate assets in the tens of billions of dollars. A closer look at his finances reveals where the money goes and, more importantly, who else signs off on it.
All eyes are on the much-discussed cabinet reshuffle expected in Cairo in the coming months. With signs that even the Prime Minister himself could be replaced, a review of his prospective successors will allay the uncertainty that this change could pose to Egypt’s investment environment.
Egypt’s military is known for its economic prowess, crafting arguably a strong business reputation for itself. There are indications suggesting that its commercial portfolio extends to the agriculture sector, where a host of known interests may position it as a key industry player.
Out with the official institutional parameters of Emirati politics lies the role of the majlis. The UAE’s power brokers are seeking to build reputations as inclusive leaders through popularity in the majlis, but this dynamic is more complex than it appears on the surface. The majlis is an interesting institution, with many sources suggesting this is where many business deals originate.