Emir of Abu Dhabi and UAE President Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan is vastly wealthy; reports indicate assets in the tens of billions of dollars. A closer look at his finances reveals where the money goes and, more importantly, who else signs off on it.
All eyes are on the much-discussed cabinet reshuffle expected in Cairo in the coming months. With signs that even the Prime Minister himself could be replaced, a review of his prospective successors will allay the uncertainty that this change could pose to Egypt’s investment environment.
Egypt’s military is known for its economic prowess, crafting arguably a strong business reputation for itself. There are indications suggesting that its commercial portfolio extends to the agriculture sector, where a host of known interests may position it as a key industry player.
Out with the official institutional parameters of Emirati politics lies the role of the majlis. The UAE’s power brokers are seeking to build reputations as inclusive leaders through popularity in the majlis, but this dynamic is more complex than it appears on the surface. The majlis is an interesting institution, with many sources suggesting this is where many business deals originate.
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This the first in a series analyses building up to the release of a Shadow Governance Intel Report on Egypt’s agriculture sector. Actors must endeavour to grasp sector dynamics at large; a critical prerequisite for reading between the lines of power plays, corruption allegations, and the political influences at work.
Although the sons of Zayed unquestionably control politics in Abu Dhabi, distant cousins on their father’s side of the family have amassed considerable political and commercial prestige. In a setting whereby political activity is confined to Nahyan figures, understanding the significance of lesser known princes is of the utmost priority.
Six months on from the sweeping arrest of politicians, princes, and businessmen in Riyadh, there are still questions surrounding the Crown Prince’s motives. Intrigue into the billions of dollars’ worth of assets that Saudi authorities acquired will continue to grow; but the silence on this topic fails to dispel concerns.
Morocco’s growing economic and diplomatic influence across sub-Saharan Africa does not appear to be slowing as the north African country seeks to join ECOWAS and cement its position as a regional leader and economic powerhouse in West Africa.
The UAE’s method of resource distribution is undergoing a period of rigorous testing, raising questions about its long term economic health. The Khalifa Fund was set up to nurture the private sector and may be the lifeline local entrepreneurs need; Shadow Governance inspects the Fund’s effect as well as those behind it.
As the country prepares to undergo what may be its first significant political transition in years, rumblings in Algeria’s energy sector suggest that the battle could be see former heavyweights involved. Staying abreast of emerging dynamics will be the key to anticipating where power will end up once power plays unfold.
Adorning the billboards around construction sites in Saudi Arabia is the Bin Laden family name. However, fame and fortune have not protected the company from Riyadh’s watchful gaze; the Crown Prince’s team are determined to reform the company and may be willing to usurp it if necessary.
Recent trends suggest that Saudi Arabia’s construction sector is undergoing substantive change, despite historically being a predictable pillar of the national economy. Combined with the Crown Prince’s ‘build it and they will come’ attitude, space is clearly opening up for new actors.