Last month Naftogaz celebrated a big victory in a lawsuit against Gazprom. However, its domestic battles have been far less victorious. One major stumbling point is the system of gas supplies dominated by oligarch Dmitry Firtash. Despite international pressure, and the obvious economic benefits of unbundling the system of gas supply and distribution, the government has been reluctant to challenge Firtash’s monopoly. Shadow Governance Intel analyses the standoff between Naftogaz and the Firtash-controlled regional gas suppliers, and explains why the government continues to resist change.
Previously not regarded as problems for Kazakhstan, trade unionism and religious fundamentalism are emerging as potential threats to social and political stability. Incidents of industrial action and terrorist attacks in the West are ostensibly a precursor of the destabilisation predicted should any future transfer of power away from Nazarbayev prove to be chaotic.
Increased affiliation to the Russian Orthodox Church has proved to be a trend among Russia’s elite groups during Putin’s third presidential term. Both the church and elite groups benefit from their mutual allegiance. While power players finance Church operations, the Church provides ideological backing to the Kremlin and a positive public image for business elite.
Over the past few years, children of Russia’s elite groups have – with increasing frequency - been appointed to high-profile positions in state-owned corporations and ministries, or have taken over their parents’ business. Shadow Governance examines how blood relations, combined with strong societal networks, are used to exert influence and engage in resource distribution.