While it is widely agreed that the illicit practice of trade misinvoicing is costing African countries billions of dollars a year, the scale of the issue remains to be debated. It can be argued that the potentially over exaggerated estimates of misinvoicing in Africa being quoted by highly-respected and influential international institutions may in some cases be counterproductive, adversely affecting their investment environments.
Just two years into his presidency, President John Magufuli’s is proving to be a polarising figure. Winning praise for his tough stance on corruption and his refusal to back down in high-profile disputes with international mining companies, Magufuli has equally attracted condemnations for his increasingly authoritarian ruling style.
President Magufuli’s increasingly authoritarian actions have attracted concerns over the state of democracy in Tanzania. There are indications that the recent closures of opposition-linked newspapers could be a mere ploy to weaken the opposition and stifle government critics.
China’s use of soft power in Africa has served to strengthen relations with individual countries and the region as a whole. Yet, despite the initial altruistic appearance of many of Beijing’s Africa initiatives, China’s involvement in the African market does not necessarily bode well for the future of transparency.
Considered a key industry in Nigeria’s economy, the mobile telecoms sector has recently enjoyed a period of unprecedented growth. Yet, competition is fierce, and the mobile segment remains largely controlled by just four operators – all of whom have attracted allegations of fraudulent behaviour in an attempt to maintain their influential positions in the market.