As one of Tanzania’s most important economic sectors and sources of foreign investment, tourism provides widespread opportunities for rent seeking and patronage activities among politicians. This trend is epitomised in the government’s relationship with the Otterlo Business Corporation (OBC), whose almost three-decade tenure in Tanzania has been plagued by allegations of corruption, human rights abuses and illicit hunting practices.
Ghana’s inviting investment climate, and apparent commitment to the long-term development of its nascent tourism sector, is making the hospitality sector an attractive target for hotel investors looking to expand into Africa. While progress is being made, challenges remain as Ghana continues to struggle with unnecessary bureaucracy, excessive regulation and infrastructural deficiencies.
While still not considered one of Ghana’s dominant economic sectors, Ghana’s new NPP administration appears to be making concerted efforts to prop the country’s tourism sector. Over the past 12 months the government has introduced a number of key initiatives to open up the country’s tourism sector to private investment and turn the country into a leisure tourism destination.
Sport hunting in Tanzania has long been synonymous with government corruption, with access to the lucrative sector believed to be controlled by a small group of elite politicians. However, the appointment of a new Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism suggests an imminent end to this trend, as sport hunting has finally attracted the attention of President John Magufuli’s war against corruption.