Despite a marked increase in judicial autonomy over the past several decades, the Tanzania judiciary remains subject to external manipulation and executive influence. Low salaries and a lack of resources further encourages corruption and rent-seeking behaviour, leading to an erosion of public confidence in this institution.
Tanzania's ruling CCM party has long dominated the country's political landscape, utilising its position in power to win - what are perceived to be - democratic elections. However, on close inspection, the intimidation and harassment of opposition politicians, activists and supporters by state institutions highlight that this 'power play' is a common tool of influence.
While cocoa smuggling between Ghana and Ivory Coast is common, allegations of corruption and other illicit practices within Ghana's cocoa sector regulator, Cocobod, may tarnish Ghana's international reputation as a reliable supplier, and could prove more damaging to the country's lucrative industry.
As several of Nigeria’s biggest LNG contracts near their end, Nigeria LNG Ltd faces the challenging task of finding potential buyers amid a continuously evolving global LNG market. This arduous task is merely exacerbated by Nigeria’s investment environment, which suffers from security concerns, legislative and policy concerns, bureaucracy and continued rampant corruption.
Nigeria’s various illicit networks enjoy varying degrees of political access and influence. In general, illicit networks have had little sway over the government in terms of influencing the decision-making process; but individually, each network is capable of impacting the country’s political, economic and social climates.
This is Part III of a three-part series reviewing the future of Africa’s electoral landscape. Today’s contribution looks towards elections in 2019 as the political landscapes in two of Africa’s biggest countries sit on a knife edge, amid allegations of corruption and broken promises.
This is Part II of a three-part series reviewing the future of Africa’s electoral landscape. Today’s contribution assesse elections that are scheduled over the coming 12 months – outlining potential outcomes, the key political players, and the methods through which incumbents will attempt to retain power in the face of increasing competition from strengthening opposition groups.
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This is Part I of a three-part series reviewing the future of Africa’s electoral landscape. Today’s contribution reviews the upcoming elections in the DRC and South Sudan – both have been subjected to various delays as their respective leaders attempt to legitimise their extended stays in power – as well as the aftermaths of various recent elections that are still playing out.
Over the last decade, wealthy Angolans have increasingly invested their wealth in lucrative sectors of Portugal’s economy. Despite its less than lucrative nature, the Portuguese media sector has not escaped Angolan interest. Largely targeted by individuals with close ties to the MPLA – investing in Portugal’s media sector has gained Luanda huge influence.
The escalation in violence in the DRC has forced Angola – traditionally one of the DRC’s staunchest allies – to scale back its support for its neighbour as the crisis begins to threaten Angola’s own security environment, particularly that of its oil-rich Cabinda province.
Despite the departure of Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s government is still made up of the same set of ZANU-PF heavyweights, serving as a reminder that the right to rule Zimbabwe revolves around the military, and liberation war credentials. Under Mnangagwa, Zimbabwe’s future remains threatened by the same patronage-based system of predatory and anti-democratic government.
The Trump administration’s Africa policy remains confused and uncertain, punctuated by clumsy attempts by various senior politicians to engage the continent. While an overall lack of interest by senior members of the new administration has allowed US civil servants in Africa to preserve some continuity, the lack of clarity over Washington’s involvement in Africa could put the US’s position as one of the continent’s biggest trading partners at risk.