The DRC’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Léonard She Okitundu, has become the face and mouthpiece of the Kabila regime on the international stage. A trusted Kabila confidante, Okitundu has the difficult job of depicting the Kabila regime as a capable and competent ally to the international community.
Endemic corruption has long rendered the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) ineffective in its role as governor and operator of Nigeria’s maritime ports, deterring investment and limiting economic development. However, the appointment of Hadiza Bala-Usman to head the critical parastatal promises an end to this trend, as President Muhammadu Buhari’s war against corruption turns to the country’s ports.
Ghana’s inviting investment climate, and apparent commitment to the long-term development of its nascent tourism sector, is making the hospitality sector an attractive target for hotel investors looking to expand into Africa. While progress is being made, challenges remain as Ghana continues to struggle with unnecessary bureaucracy, excessive regulation and infrastructural deficiencies.
While still not considered one of Ghana’s dominant economic sectors, Ghana’s new NPP administration appears to be making concerted efforts to prop the country’s tourism sector. Over the past 12 months the government has introduced a number of key initiatives to open up the country’s tourism sector to private investment and turn the country into a leisure tourism destination.
As both Russia and the DRC continue to suffer from the effects of international sanctions, an uptick in high-level diplomatic meetings between Congolese and Russian officials appears to suggest a mutual desire to develop the two countries’ nascent relationship.
Although the majority of trade in Africa is by sea, the continent’s ports are performing far below their potential in terms of efficiency. To rectify this imbalance, there is an ongoing trend towards increased private sector participation, and the transition from the public service port to a landlord port model.
The political elite of the largest ethnic group in Nigeria, the Hausa-Fulani, have retained effective control over Nigerian politics for decades. This has largely been accomplished through their occupation of command positions within government. While this dominance appears to have been cemented under President Buhari, there is no indication that it will weaken in the foreseeable future
As public confidence and trust in Nigeria’s traditional two dominant parties remains low, it is looking increasingly likely that a third political party will emerge as a real competitor in the coming months. By capitalising on the public’s demand for an alternative choice, a third political party has the potential to cause a real upset in 2019.
Belgian interests are being targeted by the DRC government in a series of apparent retaliatory attacks following Brussels’ decision to reallocate funding that was intended for the central government to humanitarian NGOs. While Kinshasa’s actions may be downplayed as political grandstanding, there are concerns that they will inevitably impact the foreign business environment.
Following President Muhammadu Buhari’s public confirmation that he would seek re-election in 2019, campaign season in Nigeria has begun. Despite the advantages of incumbency, support for Buhari has dropped over the last three years and the APC appears to be turning its attention to developing its muted support base in the PDP stronghold of the south east in exchange for its support for an Igbo presidency in 2023.
Sport hunting in Tanzania has long been synonymous with government corruption, with access to the lucrative sector believed to be controlled by a small group of elite politicians. However, the appointment of a new Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism suggests an imminent end to this trend, as sport hunting has finally attracted the attention of President John Magufuli’s war against corruption.
As President Kabila’s hold on power becomes more and more tenuous, persistent instability across the DRC has become the government’s main excuse to continue to delay new elections. This unrest appears to have been exacerbated by the actions of various illicit networks who, according to various observers, are acting on behalf of the government.